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Hyperopia - (Farsightedness)
Myopia is the medical term for nearsightedness. Nearsighted eyes are good at seeing objects that are up close but have trouble seeing objects that are far away. This is due to a refractive error in the eye.

If we suspect an ocular condition or disease,
we will immediately schedule or perform
diagnostic tests to determined our next steps.

Hyperopia is another name for farsightedness. Farsighted may sound like the opposite of nearsighted, but it is not. Farsightedness is actually very different from nearsightedness.

Nearsighted people can see close up objects and have trouble with seeing objects at a distance. Farsighted people have trouble focusing on objects in general due to a refractive error in the eyes.

Refraction is the bending of light. When a light wave enters the eye, it is bent by the cornea as it makes its way through to land on the retina. In a normal eye, the flexibility of the lens, the curvature of the cornea and the length of the eye work together to produce a clear image on the retina.

Onset and Treatment
Although farsightedness is normally present at birth, the eye can correct itself naturally as it grows. The eye stops growing around age nine. If at that point there is still a small amount of farsightedness present, the lens of the eye may change its shape to fix the eyes’ vision, a process called accommodation.

Around age forty when the eyes start to degrade, the lens can lose its flexibility and this accommodation can disappear, resulting in a condition called presbyopia. Presbyopia is actually a natural symptom of the aging process and refers to the eyes’ diminishing ability to focus.

Around this age people start having trouble with close work- any work that requires the eyes to focus on an object close to them. They may also have trouble seeing objects far away as well.

Symptoms of hyperopia include headaches, aching eyes, eye strain and trouble seeing objects that are up close. hyperopia eye farsightedness

A farsighted person may need to wear glasses or contacts to correct their vision or they may need no treatment at all as the eye can adjust to make up for the farsightedness. Farsightedness is common in children and often has no impact on the quality of life for the farsighted child in most mild cases.

A child with hyperopia may rub their eyes a lot, complain of headaches, and may have trouble reading. This difficulty with reading may present as a lack of interest in younger children.

Hyperopia in children can be hard to detect. For example, a child who has hyperopia may not stand very far away from the TV screen to see. They may stand right up close to it.

This is because the farsighted child is used to not being able to focus on finer details and standing closer to the screen allows them to at least see blurry images.

Their eyes have never been able to see fine detail, unlike a nearsighted child, who knows they can see fine detail at certain distances. A nearsighted child has very good vision at a closer range and is used to being able to see detail when objects are held close to the face.

A child may be too embarrassed to complain of vision problems or they might be unaware of the changes in their vision, emphasizing the need for regular eye exams for children. Every one to two years in school age children helps catch vision problems early on before they have a chance to affect the child’s schoolwork or their social life.

The compensating behavior of a nearsighted child and a farsighted child might look the same on the outside. Only an eye exam by a professional can diagnose whether a child is farsighted or nearsighted.

Common options for treatment are the use of glasses or contact lenses. There are other options for hyperopia which include:
• Orthokeratology, also known as corneal refractive therapy: a re-shaping of the cornea using rigid gas-permeable contacts. These contacts rest on the surface of the eye and gently re-shape the cornea. Altering the curvature of the cornea restores proper vision in the eye.

• Laser eye surgery: A surgical procedure where vision is corrected by removing a small part of the eye with a laser. Using a highly focused laser beam, a specialist cuts away a bit of eye tissue, flattening the cornea and correcting the focus.

Advanced Treatment
In particularly bad cases of hyperopia, surgery may be necessary. There are some refractive surgery procedures that can correct vision in extreme cases of myopia.

• Phakic intraocular lenses: These are thin lenses that are implanted into the eye, eliminating the need for contacts or glasses. They sit right in front of the natural lens and help the eye focus light onto the retina, which allows far away objects to be seen clearly.

• Intraocular lens transplant with clear lens extraction: A surgical procedure where the eye’s natural lens is replaced by an implant. The natural lens is removed, and a synthetic lens is put in its place. This allows most people to achieve 20/40 vision or better over time.


Diagnosis
Diagnosis of hyperopia can be made with a complete routine eye exam. The exam consists of questions about the patient’s eye sight and a physical inspection of the eyes.

The eye doctor's inspection of the eyes consists of several tests. A retinoscope allows the doctor to see the surface of the retina, while phoropter allows them to measure the refractive error of the eye and assign a prescription.

When other causes of farsightedness, such as eye disease, are ruled out and the problem with vision is determined to be a refractive error, the doctor will use a phoropter. This is the machine that allows the doctor to show a series of lenses to a patient, switching back and forth between them to determine the best fit for corrective lenses.


Risks
In extreme cases of farsightedness, glasses may be needed to prevent accommodative esotropia, a crossing of the eyes. As the eye works to accommodate for farsightedness, the eyes may become crossed. Wearing glasses can straighten out the eyes and prevent them from crossing. Another problem that can develop from extreme farsightedness is amblyopia. This is the most common cause of vision problems in children. Amblyopia is “a lazy eye”. It is caused by the brain ignoring signals from an eye producing blurred images, which makes the ignored eye weaker over time as it is not being used by the brain. Corrective treatment can include wearing glasses or wearing a patch over the normal eye to strengthen the weakened one.



Prevention
If you notice your child is squinting a lot or sitting closer to the TV, or if they have trouble catching a tossed ball, they might be affected by hyperopia. In adults, you may notice increased eye strain and headaches, trouble performing close work or aching eyes.

Always see an eye care professional immediately if you have any sudden changes in vision. This includes darkening around the edges of your vision, dark spots in front of your eyes, halos around bright lights, a loss of vision in one part of your field of sight or any other noticeable change.


We all want to to protect our eyesight and that is why it is important to have annual vision tests. This allows us to detect changes in the front of your eye so that alterations can be made to your eyeglass or contact lens prescription. We also need to inspect the retina to check if it is healthy, damaged, or showing signs of disease.



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